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Fast Food Nation (2006)

Fast Food Nation

Overview


Genre

Drama

Release Date

November 17, 2006

MPAA Rating

R

Studio

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Official Site

click here

REVIEWS RATE:  Critics  Go! Watch this movie. You'll regret if not seeing it.    Readers  Be the 1st!

Cast and Crew


Director

Richard Linklater

Producer

Malcolm McLaren, Thomas McLaren

Screenwriter

Richard Linklater, Eric Schlosser

Starring

Story


Don Henderson (Greg Kinnear)-a marketing executive at Mickey's Fast Food Restaurant chain, home of "The Big One"-has a problem. Contaminated meat is getting into the frozen patties of the company's best-selling burger. To find out why, he'll have to take a journey to the dark side of the All-American meal.Leaving the cushy confines of the company's Southern California boardroom for the immigrant-staffed slaughterhouses, teeming feedlots and cookie cutter strip malls of Middle America, what Don discovers is a "Fast Food Nation" of consumers who haven't realized it is they who are being consumed by an industry with a seemingly endless appetite for fresh meat.

When it was published in 2001, "Fast Food Nation" quickly became a New York Times bestseller, with its no-holds-barred, non-fiction exploration of "the dark side of the All-American meal." The big screen version "Fast Food Nation" is a dramatic feature penned by "Fast Food Nation" author Eric Schlosser and Oscar® nominee Richard Linklater, who also serves as director. Explains Linklater: "The movie is not a documentary, but a character study of the lives behind the facts and figures. I'm more interested in fiction than non-fiction. You get to the point through human storytelling."

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All About Fast Food Nation
2005-12-20 01:12:17

REVIEWS BY CRITICS

“..an angry movie that could shame a Big Mac lover into having a salad..”
by Wesley Morris [Boston Globe]
“..sloppy, overarching fiction that tries to do too many things at once..”
by Randy Cordova [The Arizona Republic]
“..There's a distinct lack of outrage and a wealth of emotional distance in most of the film's sequences..”
by Preston Jones [Slant Magazine]