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25th Hour (2002)

25th Hour

Overview


Genre

Drama

Release Date

December 19, 2002

MPAA Rating

R

Duration

135 min.

Production Budget

$5 millions

Studio

Touchstone Pictures

Official Site

click here

REVIEWS RATE:  Critics  Nothing's perfect, but it's worth seeing.    Readers  3 of 5 [Rate It]

Cast and Crew


Director

Spike Lee

Producer

Julia Chasman, Jon Kilik, Spike Lee, Tobey Maguire

Screenwriter

David Benioff

Starring

Story


The clock is ticking on Monty Brogan's (Academy Award(R) nominee EDWARD NORTON) freedom - in 24 hours, he goes to prison for seven long years.

Once a king of Manhattan, Monty is about to say goodbye to the life he knew - a life that opened doors to New York's swankiest clubs but also alienated him from the people closest to him. In his last day on the outside, Monty tries to reconnect with his father (BRIAN COX), who's never given up on his son, and gets together with his two closest friends from the old days, Jacob (PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN) and Slaughtery (BARRY PEPPER). Also in the mix is his girlfriend, Naturelle (ROSARIO DAWSON), who might (or might not) have been the one that tipped off the cops. Monty's not sure of much these days... but with time running out, there are choices to be made. Acclaimed director Spike Lee ("Summer of Sam", "Do the Right Thing", "Malcolm X") sheds light on a man who's unsure of how his life has led him to this point as he struggles to redeem himself in the 25th hour.

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Reader's Reviews


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REVIEWS BY CRITICS

“..The film's weakest moment is the mafia element in scenes that swerve dangerously close to farce..”
by Luisa F. Ribeiro [Boxoffice Magazine]
“..a film that is confident and occasionally graceful but will only connect with viewers who approach their hearts by way of their brains..”
by Chuck Rudolph [Slant Magazine]
“..an intelligent, thoughtful, well-acted and superbly directed film..”
by Matthew Turner [ViewLondon]