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Half of a Yellow Sun (2014)

Half of a Yellow Sun

Overview


Genre

Drama

Release Date

May 16, 2014 (Limited)

MPAA Rating

R

Duration

111 min.

Studio

Monterey Media

Official Site

click here

REVIEWS RATE:  Critics  Nothing's perfect, but it's worth seeing.    Readers  Be the 1st!

Cast and Crew


Director

Biyi Bandele

Producer

Andrea Calderwood

Screenwriter

Biyi Bandele

Starring

Story


... weaving together the lives of four people swept up in the turbulence of war. Olanna (Newton) and Kainene (Rose) are glamorous twins from a wealthy Nigerian family. Returning to a privileged city life in newly independent 1960s Nigeria after their expensive English education, the two women make very different choices. Olanna shocks her family by going to live with her lover, the "revolutionary professor" Odenigbo (Ejiofor) and his devoted houseboy Ugwu (Boyega) in the dusty university town of Nsukka; Kainene turns out to be a fiercely successful businesswoman when she takes over the family interests, and surprises herself when she falls in love with Richard (Mawle) an English writer. Preoccupied by their romantic entanglements, and a betrayal between the sisters, the events of their life loom larger than politics. However, they become caught up in the events of the Nigerian civil war, in which the lgbo people fought an impassioned struggle to establish Biafra an independent republic, ending in chilling violence which shocked the entire country and the world.

Reader's Reviews


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REVIEWS BY CRITICS

“..scenes of forced evacuation are necessarily intense, and the desperation of the refugee experience is conveyed, but Bandele still offers a rich and passionate saga..”
by Pete Vonder Haar [Village Voice]
“..'Half of a Yellow Sun' bravely takes on too broad a canvas with too narrow a budget, but it's a relevant saga that's worth telling..”
by Trevor Johnston [Time Out London]
“..the film comes across as less a portrait of complex intellectuals ideologically embroiled in a conflict than as a weepie about innocents adrift..”
by Ben Kenigsberg [NY Times]