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House M.D.

Episode 2.19 : House vs. God

House M.D. Poster

TV Info


Episode Premiere

April 25, 2006

Distributor

Fox TV

Genre

Drama

Show Period

2004 - 2012

Production Company

Heel and Toe, Shore Z, Bad Hat Harry

Cast and Crew


Director

John Showalter

Screenwriter

Doris Egan

Main Cast


Additional Cast

  • Will Rogers
  • David Cheaney
  • Michael Edwin
  • Marco A. Martinez
  • Sandra Marshall
  • Tamara Braun
  • William Katt

Synopsis


Charismatic 15-year old Boyd Mullins preaches to the congregation inside a storefront church. He places his hand on the forehead of an old woman with a walker, then pulls the walker away. With the crowd's encouragement, the woman takes a few steps on her own. Boyd offers praise to the Lord, then collapses to the ground, clutching his stomach.

At the hospital, Foreman tells Boyd that he doesn't have an intestinal blockage. Cameron draws blood and Boyd thanks her for the painless procedure. He claims that God told him she was kind. Boyd's father, Walter, helpfully explains that God speaks to Boyd quite frequently. Cameron observes that Boyd's urine is dilute, which could mean his kidneys aren't functioning properly.Charismatic 15-year old Boyd Mullins preaches to the congregation inside a storefront church. He places his hand on the forehead of an old woman with a walker, then pulls the walker away. With the crowd's encouragement, the woman takes a few steps on her own. Boyd offers praise to the Lord, then collapses to the ground, clutching his stomach.

At the hospital, Foreman tells Boyd that he doesn't have an intestinal blockage. Cameron draws blood and Boyd thanks her for the painless procedure. He claims that God told him she was kind. Boyd's father, Walter, helpfully explains that God speaks to Boyd quite frequently. Cameron observes that Boyd's urine is dilute, which could mean his kidneys aren't functioning properly.

The team presents the case to House, who can't get past the idea that God talks to Boyd. Chase tries to move things along with the report that the only medical issue showing up in the blood work is low sodium. Both Addison's and cirrhosis tested negatively. House orders his staff to monitor Boyd's saline intake. He wants to talk to this preacher boy himself.

House presses Boyd on issues of faith, but he holds his own with qualified responses. Noting that Boyd is lucid, House finds it curious that he is being treated in a hospital when his preaching keeps others from medical help.

Wilson meets with Grace, a terminal cancer patient. She's losing the battle and seems resigned to it. Wilson assures her that the right combination of pain meds exists and that he will find it. House summons Wilson to the balcony and explains that Boyd merely watches people and deduces their problems. He then gives them advice that he claims God passed on to him. This is some kind of power trip. Wilson smirks at the similarities between Boyd and House. The boy's symptoms are massive cramps and low sodium. House thinks he was probably drinking water nonstop since God told him to purify his body. The water intake would lead to low sodium, which would cause cramping. House wasn't looking to Wilson for medical advice. He just wanted to rant about seemingly intelligent people believing in religion.

Boyd slowly shuffles through the halls singing a gospel hymn. He's having a singing seizure which is a partial seizure in which people repeat lines from songs. Chase tries to lead him back to his room, but Boyd doesn't respond. He stumbles across Grace, puts his hand on her head and says that all things are possible in faith. Boyd calls upon the Lord to heal her. Wilson intervenes and has Chase get Boyd back to his room.

House wonders if they should have Boyd ask God what's wrong with him. Or else they should just do an MRI. Wilson barges in, enraged that they let Boyd roam the hallways and taunt Grace with false cures. She thinks she feels a little better but that's just a placebo effect. It will be up to Wilson to pick her back up when it isn't true.

House passes the whiteboard in his office and notices a little scoreboard putting the tally at "God 2, House 1." Boyd comes in and notes the score. House quickly points out that the game isn't over. Boyd wonders if God is in the lead because he healed Grace when she came back to his room. House counters that Boyd simply likes messing with people and giving them a rush. But when the endorphins wear off and the pain returns, Boyd is long gone. Boyd claims that doesn't happen. House asks if he's ever done studies on his track record. Boyd defensively claims that God told him it was so.

Boyd says that he can tell House looks for excuses to be alone. House dismisses this as a simple trick of deduction because of his gruff exterior. He asks Boyd for more specifics from God. Boyd says that God wants House to invite Dr. Wilson to his poker game. House stops in his tracks. Wilson does want to be a part of House's game this week, but how did Boyd know the game even existed? House accosts Wilson, but he claims that he has never talked to Boyd beyond the encounter with Grace in the hallway.

Chase shows House the MRI images and points out a small, abnormal area. House declares it to be tuberous sclerosis. It certainly would explain all of the symptoms, including the chats with God. House gives himself one more point on the scoreboard.

Wilson tells Grace a story about a doctor that the Catholic church keeps at Lourdes. While thousands of cases say people claim to feel better, the Vatican recognizes only a handful of miracles. Grace insists that she likes the view that Boyd is providing. Wilson warns her about facing reality. He offers to take new images of her liver.

Foreman and Chase break the news about tuberous sclerosis to Walter and Boyd. The disease causes small tumors to grow throughout the body, and his are expanding. They will need to perform brain surgery to remove them. This will cure his chemical imbalance, the seizures and his auditory hallucinations.

Boyd refuses the surgery. House wants Cuddy to call the lawyers, but she wants him to talk to the patient first. Yet he must approach it not as an adversary, but more like Wilson does with his patients. House finds Wilson and asks him to speak with Boyd because Cuddy requested him to do so. Wilson only agrees to do it if House lets him in the poker game. House relents.

Wilson approaches Boyd to find out why he doesn't want the tumors removed. The patient answers that God put them there for a reason. House can't stand this, and he charges that God is everywhere and doesn't need to send messages to Boyd's brain. Boyd admits to Wilson that his visions have been blurry lately. Wilson points out that this means the tumors are growing and putting pressure on his optic nerve. He asks Boyd if he thinks God wants him to die. Walter replies that God gives the most trials to his chosen ones.

Wilson asks if Boyd thinks he is a saint because the one hallmark of a saint is humility. If he rejects surgery because he thinks he's special, then he's not a true saint. True humility would force a person to at least consider the possibility that he simply has an illness. Boyd is troubled by this logic. House then congratulates Wilson on his powers of manipulation. He also wants him to bring pretzels to poker night.

House is at home when Wilson stops by with some images of Grace's cancer to prove that Boyd didn't heal her. The images showed that Grace's tumor has decreased in size. House is struck by the revelation, and he asks Wilson not to share this information with Boyd.

The next morning, House demands that Chase get him every single scrap of medical information that exists on Grace. She thinks Boyd saved her life. Cuddy mentions that Boyd and Walter have withdrawn permission for surgery, but she is putting the lawyers on it. She also has her doubts about Grace's tumor. House thinks that the only way to save Boyd is to prove that Grace is still dying. The scoreboard now reads God 3, House 2.

The team pores over Grace's records, searching for possible mistakes and mis-readings. Suspecting a delayed reaction from radiation, Chase scans Grace's home with a radiation counter. All he finds are four kinds of pain pills and an experimental LED device that's sold over the internet to stop pain. He calls House, who tells him to keep looking.

During poker night, House turns to Wilson and wonders how Boyd would have found out about their game. The only person he's been talking to is Grace. Why would Wilson tell Grace about the game? Perhaps Grace is more than just a patient. House concludes that Wilson has been sleeping with Grace. Wilson has no response. They argue. Wilson says that it happened one night when her ride didn't show up. House realizes that Wilson didn't find an apartment of his own after all. He moved in with Grace.

House accuses Wilson of having a fetish for needy people. He needs to heal them. Wilson counters that House is only angry because he couldn't tell that Wilson was hiding something. He hates Boyd because the boy is in more control than he is. This is also why religion annoys House. If it's true, then House definitely has no control over his world.

At the hospital, Walter tells Foreman and Cameron that Boyd is checking out because God said he was fine. Walter pleads with them to talk to his son.

House gets a call that Boyd has contracted a fever and is delirious. Since tuberous sclerosis doesn't cause fever, House and Wilson head to the hospital.

In front of the team, House declares that Boyd does have tuberous sclerosis, but it is only a mild case. They must perform an LP. Boyd resists, claiming that God told him not to use any more medical science. God will handle it. Foreman informs Walter that his son is delirious and that the decision is ultimately his. Boyd begs Walter to have faith. Walter tells the doctor that they don't know what's wrong with Boyd, but God does so it is in his hands. House tracks down Wilson for another speech to the family.

Wilson implores House to consider other solutions. The infection might be unrelated and he simply picked it up at the hospital. House reaches an epiphany. Boyd gave Grace a virus, which went on to attack her tumor. Researchers everywhere are experimenting with virii to fight cancer. Wilson thinks this theory is a reach and points out that the research virii have been genetically modified. House mentions herpes virii are most prone to attack cancer cells. Wilson realizes that herpes encephalitis would fit all of the symptoms.

House walks into Boyd's room and orders him to strip. House is looking for the sores that are symptomatic of herpes encephalitis, mentioning to Walter that Boyd contracted it through sex. This would explain why he was guzzling water to purify his body. As Boyd begs his father to have faith, Walter instructs the boy to take off his clothes. He pulls down his pants, revealing a sore near his left hip.

A few days later, Boyd knocks on House's door. Walter forced him to apologize. House walks over to his whiteboard, where the score is still 3-2. House asks Chase for his third point, knowing that Chase was running the scoreboard all along.

The team presents the case to House, who can't get past the idea that God talks to Boyd. Chase tries to move things along with the report that the only medical issue showing up in the blood work is low sodium. Both Addison's and cirrhosis tested negatively. House orders his staff to monitor Boyd's saline intake. He wants to talk to this preacher boy himself.

House presses Boyd on issues of faith, but he holds his own with qualified responses. Noting that Boyd is lucid, House finds it curious that he is being treated in a hospital when his preaching keeps others from medical help.

Wilson meets with Grace, a terminal cancer patient. She's losing the battle and seems resigned to it. Wilson assures her that the right combination of pain meds exists and that he will find it. House summons Wilson to the balcony and explains that Boyd merely watches people and deduces their problems. He then gives them advice that he claims God passed on to him. This is some kind of power trip. Wilson smirks at the similarities between Boyd and House. The boy's symptoms are massive cramps and low sodium. House thinks he was probably drinking water nonstop since God told him to purify his body. The water intake would lead to low sodium, which would cause cramping. House wasn't looking to Wilson for medical advice. He just wanted to rant about seemingly intelligent people believing in religion.

Boyd slowly shuffles through the halls singing a gospel hymn. He's having a singing seizure which is a partial seizure in which people repeat lines from songs. Chase tries to lead him back to his room, but Boyd doesn't respond. He stumbles across Grace, puts his hand on her head and says that all things are possible in faith. Boyd calls upon the Lord to heal her. Wilson intervenes and has Chase get Boyd back to his room.

House wonders if they should have Boyd ask God what's wrong with him. Or else they should just do an MRI. Wilson barges in, enraged that they let Boyd roam the hallways and taunt Grace with false cures. She thinks she feels a little better but that's just a placebo effect. It will be up to Wilson to pick her back up when it isn't true.

House passes the whiteboard in his office and notices a little scoreboard putting the tally at "God 2, House 1." Boyd comes in and notes the score. House quickly points out that the game isn't over. Boyd wonders if God is in the lead because he healed Grace when she came back to his room. House counters that Boyd simply likes messing with people and giving them a rush. But when the endorphins wear off and the pain returns, Boyd is long gone. Boyd claims that doesn't happen. House asks if he's ever done studies on his track record. Boyd defensively claims that God told him it was so.

Boyd says that he can tell House looks for excuses to be alone. House dismisses this as a simple trick of deduction because of his gruff exterior. He asks Boyd for more specifics from God. Boyd says that God wants House to invite Dr. Wilson to his poker game. House stops in his tracks. Wilson does want to be a part of House's game this week, but how did Boyd know the game even existed? House accosts Wilson, but he claims that he has never talked to Boyd beyond the encounter with Grace in the hallway.

Chase shows House the MRI images and points out a small, abnormal area. House declares it to be tuberous sclerosis. It certainly would explain all of the symptoms, including the chats with God. House gives himself one more point on the scoreboard.

Wilson tells Grace a story about a doctor that the Catholic church keeps at Lourdes. While thousands of cases say people claim to feel better, the Vatican recognizes only a handful of miracles. Grace insists that she likes the view that Boyd is providing. Wilson warns her about facing reality. He offers to take new images of her liver.

Foreman and Chase break the news about tuberous sclerosis to Walter and Boyd. The disease causes small tumors to grow throughout the body, and his are expanding. They will need to perform brain surgery to remove them. This will cure his chemical imbalance, the seizures and his auditory hallucinations.

Boyd refuses the surgery. House wants Cuddy to call the lawyers, but she wants him to talk to the patient first. Yet he must approach it not as an adversary, but more like Wilson does with his patients. House finds Wilson and asks him to speak with Boyd because Cuddy requested him to do so. Wilson only agrees to do it if House lets him in the poker game. House relents.

Wilson approaches Boyd to find out why he doesn't want the tumors removed. The patient answers that God put them there for a reason. House can't stand this, and he charges that God is everywhere and doesn't need to send messages to Boyd's brain. Boyd admits to Wilson that his visions have been blurry lately. Wilson points out that this means the tumors are growing and putting pressure on his optic nerve. He asks Boyd if he thinks God wants him to die. Walter replies that God gives the most trials to his chosen ones.

Wilson asks if Boyd thinks he is a saint because the one hallmark of a saint is humility. If he rejects surgery because he thinks he's special, then he's not a true saint. True humility would force a person to at least consider the possibility that he simply has an illness. Boyd is troubled by this logic. House then congratulates Wilson on his powers of manipulation. He also wants him to bring pretzels to poker night.

House is at home when Wilson stops by with some images of Grace's cancer to prove that Boyd didn't heal her. The images showed that Grace's tumor has decreased in size. House is struck by the revelation, and he asks Wilson not to share this information with Boyd.

The next morning, House demands that Chase get him every single scrap of medical information that exists on Grace. She thinks Boyd saved her life. Cuddy mentions that Boyd and Walter have withdrawn permission for surgery, but she is putting the lawyers on it. She also has her doubts about Grace's tumor. House thinks that the only way to save Boyd is to prove that Grace is still dying. The scoreboard now reads God 3, House 2.

The team pores over Grace's records, searching for possible mistakes and mis-readings. Suspecting a delayed reaction from radiation, Chase scans Grace's home with a radiation counter. All he finds are four kinds of pain pills and an experimental LED device that's sold over the internet to stop pain. He calls House, who tells him to keep looking.

During poker night, House turns to Wilson and wonders how Boyd would have found out about their game. The only person he's been talking to is Grace. Why would Wilson tell Grace about the game? Perhaps Grace is more than just a patient. House concludes that Wilson has been sleeping with Grace. Wilson has no response. They argue. Wilson says that it happened one night when her ride didn't show up. House realizes that Wilson didn't find an apartment of his own after all. He moved in with Grace.

House accuses Wilson of having a fetish for needy people. He needs to heal them. Wilson counters that House is only angry because he couldn't tell that Wilson was hiding something. He hates Boyd because the boy is in more control than he is. This is also why religion annoys House. If it's true, then House definitely has no control over his world.

At the hospital, Walter tells Foreman and Cameron that Boyd is checking out because God said he was fine. Walter pleads with them to talk to his son.

House gets a call that Boyd has contracted a fever and is delirious. Since tuberous sclerosis doesn't cause fever, House and Wilson head to the hospital.

In front of the team, House declares that Boyd does have tuberous sclerosis, but it is only a mild case. They must perform an LP. Boyd resists, claiming that God told him not to use any more medical science. God will handle it. Foreman informs Walter that his son is delirious and that the decision is ultimately his. Boyd begs Walter to have faith. Walter tells the doctor that they don't know what's wrong with Boyd, but God does so it is in his hands. House tracks down Wilson for another speech to the family.

Wilson implores House to consider other solutions. The infection might be unrelated and he simply picked it up at the hospital. House reaches an epiphany. Boyd gave Grace a virus, which went on to attack her tumor. Researchers everywhere are experimenting with virii to fight cancer. Wilson thinks this theory is a reach and points out that the research virii have been genetically modified. House mentions herpes virii are most prone to attack cancer cells. Wilson realizes that herpes encephalitis would fit all of the symptoms.

House walks into Boyd's room and orders him to strip. House is looking for the sores that are symptomatic of herpes encephalitis, mentioning to Walter that Boyd contracted it through sex. This would explain why he was guzzling water to purify his body. As Boyd begs his father to have faith, Walter instructs the boy to take off his clothes. He pulls down his pants, revealing a sore near his left hip.

A few days later, Boyd knocks on House's door. Walter forced him to apologize. House walks over to his whiteboard, where the score is still 3-2. House asks Chase for his third point, knowing that Chase was running the scoreboard all along.

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