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Passion Play (2011)

Passion Play

Overview


Genre

Drama

Release Date

May 06, 2011 (Limited)

MPAA Rating

R

Duration

94 min.

Production Budget

$14 millions

Studio

Image Entertainment

Official Site

click here

REVIEWS RATE:  Critics  Not quite bad, but it's not recommended either.    Readers  Be the 1st!

Cast and Crew


Director

Mitch Glazer

Producer

Daniel Dubiecki, Megan Ellison, Jonah M. Hirsch

Screenwriter

Mitch Glazer

Starring

Story


A terrific cast will hold you spellbound in this one of a kind seductive thriller from the screenwriter of The Recruit. The last thing washed-up jazz musician Nate Pool (Academy Award-nominee Mickey Rourke, "The Wrestler") wanted to do was betray sinister gangster Happy Shannon (Academy-Award-nominee Bill Murray, "Lost in Translation"). But it may be the last thing he does unless he can deliver Lily (Megan Fox, "Transformers"), a beautiful and mysterious carnival sideshow attraction. The stakes can't get any higher for the two lovers as they try to elude the merciless killer who will stop at nothing to keep Lily for himself. Kelly Lynch ("Drugstore Cowboy") and Rhys Ifans ("Notting Hill") costar in this gritty and unpredictable tale of redemption in the hard-boiled tradition of classic film noir.

Pictures (3 photos)


Mickey Rourke stars as Nate and Megan Fox stars as Lily in Image Entertainment's Passion Play (2011)
Poster of Image Entertainment's Passion Play (2011)

Reader's Reviews


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PREMIERE PHOTO

Kelly Lynch
35th Toronto International Film Festival - 'Passion Play' Premiere
Sep 10, 2010
Brian Austin Green, Megan Fox
35th Toronto International Film Festival - 'Passion Play' Premiere
Sep 10, 2010

REVIEWS BY CRITICS

“..tries and tries to generate some metaphorical/allegorical depth with of a story that's too simplistic to evoke much cogitation..”
by John Anderson [Variety]
“..an uneasy mix - a sort of David Lynch noir - but you can do worse than a movie..”
by Kyle Smith [New York Post]
“..it's just so awkwardly assembled, so self-seriously preachy that it's actually exhausting to watch, let alone understand..”
by Christopher Null [Filmcritic.com]