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Farewell, My Queen (2012)

Farewell, My Queen

Overview


Genre

Drama, History

Release Date

July 13, 2012 (Limited)

MPAA Rating

R

Duration

100 min.

Studio

Cohen Media Group

REVIEWS RATE:  Critics  Nothing's perfect, but it's worth seeing.    Readers  Be the 1st!

Cast and Crew


Director

Benoit Jacquot

Producer

Jean-Pierre Guerin, Kristina Larsen, Pedro Uriol

Screenwriter

Benoit Jacquot, Gilles Taurand

Starring

Story


"Farewell, My Queen" marks the return of acclaimed director Benoit Jacquot (A Single Girl, Seventh Heaven, Sade, Deep in the Woods,) and brilliantly captures the passions, debauchery, occasional glimpses of nobility and ultimately the chaos that engulfed the court of Marie Antoinette in the final days before the full-scale outbreak of the Revolution. Based on the best-selling novel by Chantal Thomas, the film stars Lea Seydoux as one of Marie's ladies-in-waiting, seemingly an innocent but quietly working her way into her mistress's special favors, until history tosses her fate onto a decidedly different path. With the action moving effortlessly from the gilded drawing rooms of the nobles to the back quarters of those who serve them, this is a period film at once accurate and sumptuous in its visual details and modern in its emotions. Diane Kruger's gives her best performance to date as the ill-fated Queen and Virginie Ledoyen is the Queen's special friend Gabrielle de Polignac.

Reader's Reviews


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REVIEWS BY CRITICS

“..the film has its own charm, a matter-of-fact treatment of lesbianism and magnifique costumes and settings guaranteed to please Upper East Side patrons..”
by Deborah Young [Hollywood Reporter]
“..a well-observed but emotionally muted costume drama that might well have been titled "My Week With Marie Antoinette"..”
by Justin Chang [Variety]
“..Farewell My Queen rarely slows down or reaches deep enough to let us feel in our hearts the psychological and historical tragedies we grasp in our heads..”
by Jon Frosch [The Atlantic]