Mia Farrow Criticized for Tweeting Cecil the Lion's Killer Address


Mia Farrow Criticized for Tweeting Cecil the Lion's Killer Address


Some Twitter users mistakenly believed Mia shared the home address of Walter J. Palmer, the dentist who killed Zimbabwe's iconic lion.
Mia Farrow joined other celebrities who vented their anger on social media following the murder of Zimbabwe's iconic lion, Cecil the Lion. But she is facing backlash after she tweeted the business address of the killer Walter J. Palmer.

Some Twitter users mistakenly believed Mia shared the home address of the dentist, asking to get her account to be suspended under the site's terms of service. One user wrote, "Hi, @Support. @MiaFarrow is doxxing someone in apparent hopes of causing them physical harm. What are your terms and conditions on that?"

A second user tweeted, "Wonder how she'd like it if people posted her home address?" A third user posted, "Maybe Donald Trump should give out your phone number." Another user added, "I hate what he did, but giving out his address isn't the way to go."

While the posting has since been removed, Mia's representative hasn't commented on the issue yet.

A Twitter spokesman refused to comment on individual accounts for privacy and security reasons. He directed The Associated Press to official Twitter rules and policies which showed that Twitter policies prohibit users from posting any addresses which "are considered or treated as private. [But] if information was previously posted or displayed elsewhere on the Internet prior to being put on Twitter, it may not be a violation of this policy."

Walter issued a letter to his patients on Tuesday, July 28 following backlash, saying that he "deeply regret that my pursuit of an activity I love and practice responsibly and legally resulted in the taking of this lion."

He explained, "In early July, I was in Zimbabwe on a bow hunting trip for big game. I hired several professional guides and they secured all proper permits. To my knowledge, everything about this trip was legal and properly handled and conducted. I had no idea that the lion I took was a known, local favorite, was collared and part of a study until the end of the hunt. I relied on the expertise of my local professional guides to ensure a legal hunt. I have not been contacted by authorities in Zimbabwe or in the U.S. about this situation, but will assist them in any inquiries they may have."


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