WHAT'S HOT?
Home > Movie > W > Where Do We Go Now? > Reviews

Where Do We Go Now? Reviews

Where Do We Go Now?

Overview


Genre :

Drama

Release Date :

May 11, 2012 (NY)

MPAA Rating :

PG-13

Director :

Nadine Labacki

Starring :

Nadine Labaki, Layla Hakim, Claude Baz Moussawbaa, Julian Farhat, Antoinette Noufaily, Kevin Abboud, Caroline Labaki, Mohammad Akil

REVIEWS RATE:  Critics  Nothing's perfect, but it's worth seeing.    Readers  Be the 1st!

2 of 5

“..too many times the performers - male and female - are at the point of hysterics in the most nails-on-a-chalkboard way..”
by Mark Olsen [Los Angeles Times]
“..the plot of Where Do We Go Now? springs from a gender divide..”
by Maria Garcia [Film Journal International]
2.5 of 4

“..the picture is dotted with whimsical comedic touches and even includes a smattering of spontaneousUmbrellas of Cherbourg-style musical numbers..”
by Stephanie Zacharek [Movieline]
3 of 5

“..the number, which seems like an outtake from another movie, is a playful diversion in a series of skits..”
by Stephen Holden [New York Times]
Review rate : C+

“..the movie gets mired in these deceptive mechanics. It shows no curiosity about the hatred, so the characters seem less than whole..”
by Owen Gleiberman [Entertainment Weekly]
2 of 5

“..the filmmaker's grasp on this inherently uneasy material is much less confident..”
by Keith Uhlich [Time Out New York]
“..the female empowerment message here is fairly soft..”
by Mary F. Pols [TIME Magazine]
“..suffers from a serious clash of styles, but it's also brave and startlingly funny-at one point verging on "Mamma Mia!"-when it isn't bleak or shocking..”
by Joe Morgenstern [Wall Street Journal]
Review rate : A-

“..in turning such a vast conflict into a comedic romp, Where Do We Go Now? sometimes feels like it's cheating or cheapening its subject matter..”
by Tasha Robinson [AV Club]
“..feels like it has been dosed with sugar to mask its distressingly bitter taste..”
by Alison Willmore [Village Voice]
2 of 4

“..awkwardly hybridizing somber politicized drama with regional humor..”
by Nick Schager [Slant Magazine]
“..all it offers is a picturesque location, likable characters and the best of intentions..”
by Mark Jenkins [NPR]

Reader's Reviews


Screen Name
Rate This Movie
Please Enter   
Comment
 
 
 
RSS
FB
Twitter

LATEST REVIEWS

PAUL BLART: MALL COP 2 :

“..the rest was a blur of weak slapstick, one over-dyed moustache and vague sexism, ageism and sizeism..”
by Sara Stewart [New York Post]

CHILD 44 :

“..unrelentingly grim, plodding, and close-to-incoherent adaptation of Tom Rob Smith's best-selling mystery..”
by Steven Rea [Philadelphia Inquirer]

UNFRIENDED :

“..a flashy new coat of paint for the "found footage" genre of horror movie, replacing wobbly handheld cameras with webcams and Skype. Unfortunately, the engine underneath that gloss is woefully familiar, offering the same jump scares we've seen..”
by Jacob Hall [NY Daily News]

MONKEY KINGDOM :

“..these gorgeous-looking films are so much more than chronicles of nature. They have a heart and an insight that's remarkable..”
by Joe Neumaier [NY Daily News]

ALEX OF VENICE :

“..although it's enjoyable, actor Chris Messina's directorial debut is somehow less than the sum of its parts, wading only through the shallow end of familiar human conflicts resolved too conveniently to satisfy..”
by Barbara VanDenburgh [Arizona Republic]

TRUE STORY :

“..lightweight script doesn't help a grandiose premise..”
by John Anderson [Newsday]

MONSTERS: DARK CONTINENT :

“..plays like a dorm-room answer to modern war films, complete with the constant profanity and masculine hysterics that pass for impact in an immature script..”
by Katie Rife [A.V. Club]

THE ROAD WITHIN :

“..three superb young actors try but fail to bolster a thin script..”
by Stephen Farber [Hollywood Reporter]

BEYOND THE REACH :

“..it isn't nearly as much creepy fun as it sounds like..”
by Stephen Whitty [Newark Star-Ledger]

THE SQUEEZE :

“..between plot and character, there are definitely 18 holes in "The Squeeze"..”
by Robert Abele [LA Times]