Martin Sheen Glad Son Emilio Keeps Spanish Immigrant Father's Name for Hollywood Career
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Having shared his honest thought when asked if he objected to his children going into acting, the 'Judas and the Black Messiah' stars opens up about the one regret he has in his life.

AceShowbiz - Martin Sheen felt so proud of Emilio Estevez's choice of stage moniker. When talking in a new interview about how he felt seeing his children following his footsteps in going into action, the "Judas and the Black Messiah" star confessed he was grateful that his eldest son kept his Spanish immigrant father's name for his Hollywood career.

In an interview with Closer Weekly published in June, the 82-year-old actor expressed his gladness by stating, "The only influence I had on Emilio was to keep his name. When he started out, his agent was advising him to change his name to Sheen and he wouldn't do it." He further stressed, "And I thank God he didn't."

Martin went on to express his regret for choosing to ditch his own birth name professionally. "That's one of my regrets," he stated before explaining, "I never changed my name officially. It's still Ramon Estevez on my birth certificate. It's on my marriage license, my passport, driver's license."

"Sometimes you get persuaded when you don't have enough insight or even enough courage to stand up for what you believe in, and you pay for it later. But, of course, I'm only speaking for myself," the 1973 movie "Badlands" actor added.

A son to immigrant parents, Martin spilled, "My father was from Spain, and my mother was from Ireland." He took on a new name after butting heads with his father about his career aspiration choice. "My father was very practical. He was a factory worker for most of his adult life, and he wanted me to go to college and improve my chances of making a better living than he did," he explained.

The veteran actor then continued recounting his past with his father. "[My father] was a big fan of TV westerns in the '50s. One night, we started a discussion about my going to New York," he shared, adding, "We had some very, very painful confrontations about it."

Martin went on detailing, "He said to me, 'You want to go into the theater. You can't sing, you can't dance. You don't know what you're doing!' I said, 'Pop, you sit here every night watching westerns - do you see anyone singing or dancing?' He said, 'No, but you don't ride a horse either.' "

Despite the clash, Martin got his father's blessing at the end. "He finally saw that I was committed and realized it would be a life and death struggle with me if I didn't pursue it. When I got ready to go, he blessed me, and he continued to bless me the rest of his life. I adored him," he added.

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