Kimora Lee Simmons Celebrates Daughter's Harvard Acceptance by Taking Shots at Lori Loughlin
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In an Instagram video which documents the moment Aoki Lee Simmons learns about her acceptance, the actress is heard saying, 'Thank God you got in on your own honey cause you can't row.'

AceShowbiz - Not all celebrities take advantage of their fame and wealth to get their children into prestigious universities, and Kimora Lee Simmons is among them. Her daughter, Aoki Lee Simmons, was recently accepted into Harvard University at 16 and the actress couldn't be any happier about it. She even took the time to take shots at Lori Loughlin, who is involved in college admissions scandal, while celebrating her daughter's milestone.

Aoki took to Instagram on Thursday, March 28 to share the good news with her followers, sharing a video of the moment she learned about her acceptance. The teen was understandably emotional over it when Kimora decided to insert some jokes, "Thank God you got in on your own honey cause you can't row."

That was a direct shot at Lori, who allegedly paid bribes up to $500,000 to a school coach to falsely state that her daughters were recruits for the rowing team at the University of Southern California.

Not stopping there, she added in an Instagram Stories video, "She really did it on her own merit, and we're really so proud. Because Aoki can't row, or anything like that. There was really no hope for us in that area. I'm so proud."

Congratulations, Aoki!

Lori was among the 50 people indicted by federal authorities in Boston, Massachusetts as part of the U.S. wide college admissions cheating scam. Previous report suggested that her daughters, Olivia Jade and Isabella Rose, had withdrawn from the university following the scandal, but it has recently been revealed that they are still enrolled at USC.

Adding more troubles to her life, Olivia recently tried to trademark the brands "Olivia Jade Beauty" and "Olivia Jade", but was rejected in part because of improper punctuation on her application. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office stated in a notice that the girl had to "correct the punctuation in the identification to clarify the individual items in the list of goods."

"Proper punctuation in identifications is necessary to delineate explicitly each product or service within a list and to avoid ambiguity," so the notice read. "Commas, semicolons, and apostrophes are the only punctuation that should be use."

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