Karl-Anthony Towns Receives COVID-19 Vaccine a Week Before Mom's Death Anniversary from the Virus
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Rolling up his sleeve and covering his face with a black mask, the Minnesota Timberwolves player gives the camera a thumb-up as a medical staff administered his first dose of vaccine shot.

AceShowbiz - Karl-Anthony Towns understands how important it is to encourage people in getting their COVID-19 vaccine shot. Nearly a year after losing his mother to the deadly virus, the Minnesota Timberwolves player showed fans and social media followers that he has received his first dose of the vaccine.

On Tuesday, April 6, the 25-year-old posted an Instagram photo of him getting the first jab. He could be seen siting with the sleeve of his black shirt rolled up as a medical staff administered the injection. Covering his face with black mask and sporting New York Yankees Brown MLB cap, he gave the camera a thumb-up.

"Shot 1 [checked emoji]," the boyfriend of Jordyn Woods simply caption his post, which got fellow NBA player Paul George joked, "They say it shrinks your foot [anguished-face emoji]." A fan, in the meantime, sent tribute to his late mom by writing, "For your momma [love emoji] big fan since watching you at Kentucky & love seeing you dominate in the league [applause emoji]."

Karl-Anthony got his first dose of the vaccine only a week before the one-year anniversary of his mother's tragic death. Jacqueline Towns passed away in April 2020 due to complications from the novel coronavirus. Her family announced the sad loss in a statement shared by the Timberwolves one day after her death.

"Jackie, as she was affectionately known among family and friends, had been battling the virus for more than a month when she succumbed on April 13th," the Towns family said in the statement. "Jackie was many things to many people, a wife, mother, daughter, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend."

Weeks earlier, Karl-Anthony talked about Jacqueline's deteriorating condition. "She kept getting worse, she kept getting worse, and the hospital was doing everything they can," he said in a video posted in March. "We always thought the next medicine would help. The next one would help. This is the one that's going to get it done. This one will make sure to get it done."

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