Ice Cube Files Lawsuit Against Robinhood for Using His Pic and Lyrics Without Permission
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The rapper sues the company after his picture from film 'Are We Done Yet?' and his infamous 'Check Yo' Self' line is used to promote their new Snacks brand.

AceShowbiz - Ice Cube is suing Robinhood for allegedly using his likeness without permission. Having found his picture and lyrics being used to promote the financial services company, the "No Vaseline" rapper was unveiled to have filed a lawsuit against it.

The 51-year-old MC, whose real name is O'Shea Jackson Sr., took the legal action upon learning his image with John C. McGinley from film "Are We Done Yet?" was used in the March 8 edition of Robinhood Snacks newsletter. Beneath the photo, it was written, "Correct yourself, before you wreck yourself," referring to his 1992 hit "Check Yo Self".

Cube's lawsuit, which was obtained by Bloomberg Law, stated, "Defendants deliberately and shamelessly misappropriated Ice Cube's image and likeness to promote Robinhood's horrible products and services - and the last things in the world to which Ice Cube would ever attach his image and likeness." It further read, "This blatant theft of Ice Cube's image and likeness to endorse Robinhood's dangerous products and services has resulted in substantial damage to Ice Cube."

"Just as Robinhood's recent well-known conduct has resulted in Congressional investigations and numerous class action lawsuits, so too has it stolen and diminished the hard-earned image and brand of Ice Cube," the complaint continued. "In a cynical effort to appeal to a young demographic, Robinhood has engaged celebrity endorsers such as Jay-Z, Nas, and Jared Leto to endorse its products and services. Robinhood has picked on the wrong man this time."

Reacting to the "22 Jump Street" actor's filing, Robinhood told TMZ, "No, we didn't use his image without permission." The company went on to note, "The image was licensed and used for non-commercial, editorial purposes in connection with a blog article."

While the company remained defiant, a source close to Cube argued to the outlet, "This is Robinhood exhibiting lack of respect for the law or the people they hurt." The source then pointed out, "Ice Cube did NOT license his image nor his lyrics printed next to his picture, and would never endorse Robinhood."

"When asked to take it down because he was offended, Robinhood refused," the insider went on. "In addition, calling blatant propaganda for Robinhood's trading app and online services merely 'editorial use' shows someone needs to send their lawyer back to school."

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