'Game of Thrones' Actor Says Cast Will Get Their Lines Through Earpieces


'Game of Thrones' Actor Says Cast Will Get Their Lines Through Earpieces


Nikolaj Coster-Waldau revealed that the cast wouldn't be getting full scripts of the eighth and final season, but instead would get the lines through earpieces.
"Game of Thrones" is done with having leaks during or prior its new season and takes extreme measures when it comes to make sure that any detail of the upcoming eighth and final season of the hit series is kept tightly under wraps, even from its own cast. Star Nikolaj Coster-Waldau revealed on "Skavlan", a Norwegian-Swedish TV show, on Thursday, October 12 that the cast wouldn't be getting full scripts for the new season.

"The first season we got the scripts like you should get them and then you could sit and do notes and stuff," the actor said. "And then after a couple of years, they got paranoid because there was some leaks so we had to get them only digital, on a PDF file."

"And then the hack happened, so now we're not even going to get the script," the Jaime Lannister depicter shared. "Now we are going to do a scene, we will be told what's going to happen and then we roll."

The actor explained the hit HBO show ditched the traditional way and went total extreme as the cast would be given earpieces prior to filming. "We're all going to have earpieces for the scene and then someone's going to tell you the line and then you're going to do the line," he said.

Some fans assume that Coster-Waldau may be exaggerating a bit, since it is seemingly hard to apply such process on a production of "Game of Thrones" scale and quality. However, as absurd as it may sound, everything is possible if the show really vows to guard the end of their story as well as they can.

Previous report suggested that the show would film multiple versions of the ending of season 8 in an attempt to prevent leaks. HBO's president of programming Casey Bloys said, "I know in 'Game of Thrones', the ending, they're going to shoot multiple versions so that nobody really know what happens."

He added, "You have to do that on a long show. Because when you're shooting something, people know. So they're going to shoot multiple versions so that there's no real definitive answer until the end."


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