Mumford and Sons Blasts Jay-Z's Tidal, Says They Have No Desire to Join It


Mumford and Sons Blasts Jay-Z's Tidal, Says They Have No Desire to Join It


The band's frontman Marcus Mumford disagrees with the service's compensation structure, explaining that 'smaller bands should get paid more for it.'
Mumford & Sons isn't a fan of Jay-Z's newly-launched Tidal. The British folk/rock band complained about the compensation structure as they opened up about how they really thought about the streaming service in a new interview with The Daily Beast.

"We wouldn't have joined it anyway, even if they had asked," said frontman Marcus Mumford. "We don't want to be tribal." He then shared his opinion on how smaller artists should be paid more, explaining, "I think smaller bands should get paid more for it. Bigger bands have other ways of making money, so I don't think you can complain."

"When they say it's artist-owned, it's owned by those rich, wealthy artists... I don't want to align myself with Spotify, Beats, Tidal, or whatever. We want people to listen to our music in their most comfortable way, and if they're not up for paying for it, I don't really care," he added.

Mumford & Sons' guitarist Winston Marshall had some harsh words for Tidal too. Calling stars like Madonna, Rihanna and Kanye West who supported the service "new school f**king plutocrats," he said, "We don't want to be part of some Tidal 'streaming revolution' nor do we want to be Taylor Swift and be anti-it."

Making reference to the "Shake It Off" singer's op-ed in the Wall Street Journal about how music shouldn't be free, Marshall added, "I don't understand her argument, either. The focus is slightly missed. Music is changing. It's f**king changing. This is how people are going to listen to music now - streaming. So diversify as a band. It doesn't mean selling your songs to adverts. We look at our albums as stand-alone pieces of art, and also as adverts for our live shows."

Despite their opinion about Tidal, Mumford & Sons doesn't think that technology is bad. "Smaller bands have a better opportunity in the music industry now than they've ever had, because you don't need to have a record deal to have your music listened to worldwide," Mumford said. "It's democratized the music industry."



Mumford & Sons is currently gearing up to release their new album, "Wilder Mind". In anticipation of the follow-up to the Grammy-winning "Babel", they visited "Saturday Night Live" over the weekend to promote the record by performing two songs off it, the lead single "Believe" and the recently-dropped "The Wolf".




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