WHAT'S HOT?

'Game of Thrones' 4.03 Preview: Tyrion Claims He's Set Up, Dany Wages War

April 14, 2014 04:50:29 GMT

Tyrion is in trouble following the bloody wedding, Dany attacks the people of Meereen, and Davos Seaworth doubts Melisandre's prophecy.


'Game of Thrones' 4.03 Preview: Tyrion Claims He's Set Up, Dany Wages War
See larger image

"Game of Thrones" teases the aftermath of the bloody Purple Wedding in a preview for next week's episode. Tyrion is blamed for [SPOILER ALERT!] the death of King Joffrey, but he claims that he has been set up for the murder he didn't commit.

Though her daughter has just lost her new husband, Lady Olenna believes that Margaery's circumstances have "improved remarkably." Margaery seemingly disagrees, saying that she would have been the queen.

At the Wall, Jon Snow makes a speech as he leads his brothers of the Watch in a fight against the wildlings led by Mance Rayder. Elsewhere, Dany attacks the people of Meereen and Davos Seaworth questions Stannis Baratheon how visions and prophecy could help win a war.

"Breaker of Chains" airs Sunday, April 20 at 9/8c on HBO. In the episode, Tyrion ponders his options. Tywin extends an olive branch. Sam realizes Castle Black isn't safe, and Jon proposes a bold plan. The Hound teaches Arya the way things are. Dany chooses her champion.

In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, co-showrunner David Benioff talks how the wedding was the perfect setting for Joffrey's death. "Weddings bring out the worst in a lot of people and this is supposed to be a showcase of his power," he says. "His sigil is everywhere. He's wearing his finest clothes. He invited the most powerful people. And of course, it goes terribly wrong."

Meanwhile, "Game of Thrones" books author George R.R. Martin says he "knew all along when and how Joffrey was going to die, and on what occasion." He explains, "I'd been building up to it for three years through the first books. Part of it was that there's a lot of darkness in the books."

Of what the tragic death signifies, he elaborates, "It shows that yes, nobody is safe-sometimes the good guys win, sometimes the bad guys win. Nobody is safe and that we are playing for keeps. I also tried to provide a certain moment of pathos with the death."

He adds, "And there's kind of a moment there where he knows that he's dying and he can't get a breath and he's kind of looking at Tyrion and at his mother and at the other people in the hall with just terror and appeal in his eyes-you know, 'Help me mommy, I'm dying.' And in that moment, I think even Tyrion sees a 13-year-old boy dying before him. So I didn't want it to be entirely, 'Hey-ho, the witch is dead.' I wanted the impact of the death to still strike home on to perhaps more complex feelings on the part of the audience, not necessarily just cheering."



© AceShowbiz.com




Post Your Comments


Screen Name
Please Enter   
Comment
 
 
 
RSS
FB
Twitter