New York Times Reacts to Gwyneth Paltrow's Rebuff Over Ghostwriter Claims

March 20, 2012 03:31:15 GMT

A representative for the newspaper says, 'The article does not merit correction,' while its reporter Julia Moskin comes out with a follow-up piece that discusses more on cookbook ghostwriter.


Gwyneth Paltrow
See larger image
Photo credit: FayesVision/WENN

After an article in The New York Times' Dining section suggested that she used a ghostwriter for her cookbook "My Father's Daughter," Gwyneth Paltrow fired back by stating that the paper needs to do some facts checking. The publication, however, stood by the article written by Julia Moskin, and told E! News through its representative, "The article does not merit correction."

Moskin herself has come out with a follow-up piece titled "More About Chefs, Their Recipes and Who Writes Cookbooks". In it, she acknowledged that the likes of Jamie Oliver, Rachael Ray, Gwyneth Paltrow and Mario Batali have responded to her "I Was a Cookbook Ghostwriter" article.

"All four have acknowledged, in print, working with collaborators on their books - but all objected to what they saw as the implication that they were not the authors of their own work," she noted. "While the article dealt with a wide range of assistance, it became clear that the notion of 'ghostwriting' carried a strong stigma in the food world."

Moskin continued to talk about ghost-cooking. Describing it as "rarer than the routine work of wrestling hot, messy, complicated recipes onto the page in comprehensible English," she explained, "That work can include transcribing scribbled notes into logical sentences. Measuring out ingredients and putting them in order. Producing the routine bits of the book like the glossary and the guide to ingredients."

In the end of her article, Moskin additionally noted that all three celebrity chefs, Jamie Oliver, Rachael Ray and Mario Batali, told the Times that "some other chefs should have been included in the article, but not them."

Paltrow herself has denied that Julia Turshen was the writer behind "My Father's Daughter". The Pepper Potts of "Iron Man", who is in the process of writing the follow-up of her book, wrote on Twitter, "Love @nytimes dining section but this weeks facts need checking. No ghost writer on my cookbook, I wrote every word myself."

© AceShowbiz.com




Post Your Comments

posted by Lalala on Mar 20, 2012
Sorry but if she calls assistants ghost writers then that's just ridiculous! If you are not a professional you need help from someone who knows how a cookbook works. And Jamie Oliver for example has so many other amazing projects going on its totally understandable if someone else tests a recipe for him... Ghost writing sounds like they just put their names under something an unknown person created. I think this article is just provocative but nothing else really.

Screen Name
Please Enter   
Comment
 
 
 
RSS
FB
Twitter