WHAT'S HOT?
Home > Movie > T > Tetsuo: The Bullet Man

Tetsuo: The Bullet Man (2011)

Tetsuo: The Bullet Man

Overview


Genre

Action, Sci-Fi

Release Date

January 21, 2011 (Limited)

Duration

79 min.

Studio

IFC Films

Official Site

click here

REVIEWS RATE:  Critics  Not quite bad, but it's not recommended either.    Readers  Be the 1st!

Cast and Crew


Director

Shinya Tsukamoto

Producer

Shin-Ichi Kawahara, Masayuki Tanishima, Shinya Tsukamoto

Screenwriter

Shinya Tsukamoto, Hisakatsu Kuroki

Starring

  • Eric Bossick
  • Akiko Mono
  • Yuko Nakamura
  • Stephen Sarrazin
  • Tiger Charlie Gerhardt

Story


The third installment in the series, TETSUO III: THE BULLET MAN, and Tsukamoto's first English-language film, stars Eric Bossick as Anthony, a young man who was born and raised in Tokyo and is now raising a family there. What should be a happy time in Anthony's life is not: his wife is crippled by anxiety and unable to leave the house. She also has recurring nightmares about a horrible fate awaiting the pair's young son, Tom. Those nightmares turn out to be prophetic when Tom is cruelly run down in the street. Losing their boy pushes Yuriko over the edge and triggers violent emotions in Anthony, whose body begins to transform. Anthony flies into a terrible rage, and soon discovers that the power of his emotion transforms him into a strange, metallic monster. When the driver who killed Tom reappears and Anthony learns the truth about his father's past experiments on human guinea pigs and about his mother's death, Anthony mutates into a mass of metal - a human weapon fueled by an uncontrollable rage. This delights the mysterious man who ran down Anthony's son, a man who now continually taunts Anthony from a distance.

Watch Video (1 video)


Reader's Reviews


Screen Name
Rate This Movie
Please Enter   
Comment
 
 
 
RSS
FB
Twitter

REVIEWS BY CRITICS

“..another impotent attempt to imitate the inimitable..”
by Renn Brown [Chud]
“..it's loopy, loony and doesn't care an ounce that it doesn't make a like of sense, and yet Tsukamoto's handling of it all is as self-assured and as confident as ever..”
by Sara Michelle Fetters [MovieFreak.com]
“..doesn't bring much new to the half-man-half-machine concept, but with its delirious editing and eardrum-crunching soundtrack, it punches above its weight and musters a certain retro charm with its old-school effects..”
by Leslie Felperin [Variety]