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Hide Your Smiling Faces (2014)

Hide Your Smiling Faces

Overview


Genre

Drama

Release Date

March 28, 2014 (Limited)

Duration

81 min.

Studio

Tribeca Film

Official Site

click here

REVIEWS RATE:  Critics  Nothing's perfect, but it's worth seeing.    Readers  Be the 1st!

Cast and Crew


Director

Daniel Patrick Carbone

Producer

Daniel Patrick Carbone, Jordan Bailey-Hoover, Matthew Petock, Zachary Shedd

Screenwriter

Daniel Patrick Carbone

Starring

  • Ryan Jones
  • Nathan Varnson
  • Colm O'Leary
  • Thomas Cruz
  • Christina Starbuck
  • Chris Kies
  • Andrew M. Chamberlain
  • Ivan Tomic
  • Clark Middleton

Story


An atmospheric exploration of life and death in rural America, as seen through the distorted lens of youth.

"Hide Your Smiling Faces" vividly depicts the young lives of two brothers as they abruptly come of age through the experience of a friend's mysterious death. The event ripples under the surface of their town, unsettling the brothers and their friends in a way that they can't fully understand. Once familiar interactions begin to take on a macabre tone in light of the tragic accident, leading Eric and Tommy to retreat into their wild surroundings. As the two brothers vocally face the questions they have about mortality, they simultaneously hold their own silent debates within their minds that build into seemingly insurmountable moral peaks. "Hide Your Smiling Faces" is a true, headlong glimpse into the raw spirit of youth, as well as the calluses that one often develops as a result of an unfiltered past.

Reader's Reviews


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REVIEWS BY CRITICS

“..is certainly serious, nicely scored and well (if dimly) shot..”
by Stephen Whitty [Newark Star-Ledger]
“.."Hide Your Smiling Faces" is extremely light on traditional plot..”
by Jordan Hoffman [Film.com]
“..but the many silences in "Hide Your Smiling Faces" don't speak quite loudly enough, and the film ultimately gets bogged down by its own ponderousness..”
by Sara Stewart [New York Post]